University at Buffalo Department of History

PEOPLE

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Erik R. Seeman, Professor
office: 534 Park Hall
email: seeman@buffalo.edu
phone: (716) 645-5648

Education: PhD, Michigan, 1995


Courses Regularly Taught:
HIS 161: U.S. History to 1865
HIS 215: Death in America
HIS 452: Indians: Africans: and Europeans in Colonial America
HIS 533: Readings in Early American History
HIS 534: The Atlantic World: 1400-1800


Field(s): America, North and South Atlantic


Hub(s): Culture and Society, Transnational


Research Interests: colonial North America: religion, Indians, African-Americans, death


Current Research: Speaking with the Dead in the Early Modern Anglo-Atlantic World: A Prehistory of Organized Spiritualism


Selected Publications:

 

BOOKS:

The Huron-Wendat Feast of the Dead: Indian-European Encounters in Colonial North America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011)

Death in the New World: Cross-Cultural Encounters, 1492-1800 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010)

The Atlantic in Global History, 1500-2000, co-edited with Jorge Canizares-Esguerra (Prentice-Hall, 2007)

Pious Persuasions:   Laity and Clergy in Eighteenth-Century New England (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999)

 

SELECTED ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS:

"Reassessing the 'Sankofa Symbol' in New York's African Burial Ground," William and Mary Quarterly, vol 67 (January 2010): 101-22

"Jews in the Early Modern Atlantic:   Crossing Boundaries, Keeping Faith," in The Atlantic in Global History, 1500-2000, edited by Jorge Canizares-Esguerra and Erik R. Seeman (Prentice-Hall, 2007), 39-59.

"Desire and Distrust:   The Paradox of Women at Old Fort Niagara," New York History , vol. 85 (Winter 2004): 5-21 (co-authored with Elizabeth S. Pena)

"Spooky Streets:   Spirits of the Past Haunt Ghost Tours,"Common-Place:   The Interactive Journal of Early American Life , vol. 3, no. 1 (October 2002)

"Reading Indians' Deathbed Scenes:   Ethnohistorical and Representational Approaches,"Journal of American History , vol. 88 (June 2001): 17-47

“‘It Is Better To Marry Than To Burn’: Anglo-American Attitudes Toward Celibacy, 1600-1800,” Journal of Family History, vol. 24 (October 1999): 397-419

"'Justise Must Take Plase':   Three African Americans Speak of Religion in Eighteenth-Century New England,? William and Mary Quarterly , vol. 56 (April 1999): 395-416 (JSTOR)


Awards:

Fulbright Research and Teaching Fellowship, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados, January to May 2005

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers, August 2001 to July 2002

 

 

Last updated: Tuesday, September 18, 2012

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