University at Buffalo Department of History

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News:

History Department Senior Featured Speaker at College of Arts and Sciences Scholarship and Award Reception

The College of Arts and Sciences hosted the 2014 Scholarship and Awards reception on Oct. 24, in the Center for the Arts. The evening event highlighted student excellence and recognized alumni with special awards. Destiny Johnson, a History major and one of the winners of the Milligan Scholarship was a featured speaker. Congratulations, Destiny!

 

2014 Willie Lee Rose Prize for the best book on Southern history written by a woman or women in 2013. - See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/006.html#sthash.D87c1wi8.dpuf
2014 Willie Lee Rose Prize for the best book on Southern history written by a woman or women in 2013. - See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/006.html#sthash.D87c1wi8.dpuf
2014 Willie Lee Rose Prize for the best book on Southern history written by a woman or women in 2013. - See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/006.html#sthash.D87c1wi8.dpuf

Research Grant Awarded to Department Senior Lauren Wehner

 

Recognized for her scholarship in post-Civil War culture and violence in the American South, Emberton was honored for her book, “Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence, and the South after the Civil War” - See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2014/12/006.html#sthash.D87c1wi8.dpu
Southern Association for Women Historians
Southern Association for Women Historians

Senior honors major Lauren Wehner has been awarded a research grant by UB’s Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (CURCA) so that she can do thesis research in the archives of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences—yes, the Oscar people—in Beverly Hills.

Her thesis, which she is writing under the direction of Prof. David Herzberg, is titled “Cold War Ideology or Corporate Profit?: The Motivation behind Hollywood’s Movietime U.S.A Tours, 1951-1952.” Almost all CURCA awardees are in the sciences, so we can be especially proud of Lauren for showing the flag for the humanities!

Carole Emberton Recognized by The Southern Association for Women Historians

Professor Emberton's book, "Beyond Redemption: Race, Violence and the South after the Civil War" (University of Chicago Press, 2013), has been awarded the 2014 Willie Lee Rose Prize for the best book on Southern History written by a woman or women in 2013.  Professor Emberton was awarded this prize at the Southern Historical Association Convention in Atlanta last November.  Congratulations, Dr. Emberton! 

History Department Undergraduates to present at

Phi Alpha Theta Conference

Three of our undergraduate history majors will be presenting papers at the “History Across the Humanities” conference at Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio, in February 2015.  The conference, which will host both undergraduate and graduate student researchers, is sponsored by the YSU chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta National History Honors Society.   Our UB presenters, all members of UB’s Phi Alpha Theta chapter and of the History Honors Program, will present research they have conducted as part of their senior honors theses.  Victoria Iachetta will present a paper titled “’No Wonder Pizza is Already as American as Apple Pie!’: The Assimilation of an Ethnic Dish into 1950’s America.”  Victoria is a double major in History and English, writing her thesis under the direction of Professor Gail Radford.  Zoltan Roka’s paper is titled “Serving Beyond his Proper Estate: The Development of the English Peerage, Gentry and Chivalric Classes 1450-1509.”  Zoltan, who is working with Professor Claire Schen on his thesis project, is a recipient of SUNY, Buffalo’s Provost Scholarship and a cadet in Army ROTC.  Lauren Wehner will offer a paper titled “Cold War Ideology or Corporate Profit?: The Motivation behind Hollywood’s Movietime U.S.A Tours, 1951-1952.”  A recipient of the History Department’s Argo Memorial Scholarship, she is completing her thesis with mentor Professor David Herzberg. 

The Graduate History Association is calling for paper and panel proposals for the 24th Annual Milton Plesur Graduate History Conference

Recently Published Articles:

Carole Emberton published an article,"Only Murder Makes Men: Reconsidering the Black Military Experience," Journal of the Civil War Era, 2, No . 3 (2012), which explores how abolitionists, military officials, and historians have created and maintained a discourse of martial manhood that equated freedom with fighting that entailed mixed implications for African Americans in the Civil War Era. Emberton argues that while martial manhood paved the way for black citizenship it also limited black participation in important ways and helped create a violent political culture in the Reconstruction South.

Jennifer Gaynor published an article "Piracy in the Offing: the Law of Lands and the Limits of Sovereignty at Sea," Anthropological Quarterly 85, 3 ( 2012), which uses the offing as a metaphor to theorize piracy in relation to pivotal moments in Southeast Asia's maritime engagement with the world. "In the offing" usually indicates that something is about to happen. This figurative meaning derives from a literal one that refers to the visible sea beyond inshore navigational hazards. Nautically apt, the offing's literal sense also provides a useful metaphor for analyzing piracy. This analysis informs a discussion of infamous ethnic names that signified "pirates" in colonial European and Southeast Asian discourses. It then also anchors critical observations about contemporary piracy and the notion of failed states.

Published: David Herzberg published an article "Blockbusters and controlled substances: Miltown, Quaalude, and consumer demand for drugs in postwar America," Cambridge Studies in the History and Philosophy of the Biological Sciences 42,(4) (December 2011) explores an enduring irony of the American medical system: the need for regulatory campaigns to tame lively markets for drugs that had become popular, in part, because of advertising campaigns. This article uses the Miltown and Quaalude sagas to explore the issue of consumer demand for prescription medicines, arguing that efforts to stoke or quash that demand have shaped (and linked) America's medical system and its drug control regimes.

David Herzberg published an article "Blockbusters and controlled substances: Miltown, Quaalude, and consumer demand for drugs in postwar America," Cambridge Studies in the History and Philosophy of the Biological Sciences 42,(4) (December 2011) explores an enduring irony of the American medical system: the need for regulatory campaigns to tame lively markets for drugs that had become popular, in part, because of advertising campaigns. This article uses the Miltown and Quaalude sagas to explore the issue of consumer demand for prescription medicines, arguing that efforts to stoke or quash that demand have shaped (and linked) America's medical system and its drug control regimes.

Conferences:

The Milton Plesur Graduate History Conference

Saturday, March 7 2015

University at Buffalo

The State University of New York

Buffalo, NY

Student Union

Each year, the GHA hosts the annual Milton Plesur Conference, a graduate conference named in honor of the late Milton Plesur, a distinguished professor of History who taught at the University at Buffalo from 1955 to 1987. The conference has no overarching theme, and all works of historical inquiry are considered, with no restrictions placed upon the themes, chronological periods, or general areas of study that the papers can cover. Like the GHA, the conference embraces interdisciplinary approaches to the study of history, and graduate students from a number of different disciplines have presented papers on a wide variety of historical topics since the conference was first held on April 15, 1993.

The G.H.A. is pleased to announce that our keynote speaker will be Dr. Tong Lam, Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto. Dr. Lam’s research interests include modern China and Southeast Asia, postcolonial studies, cultural studies, and science and technology studies. His keynote will address urban spaces, the nation-state, and colonialism in modern and contemporary China. Moreover, he will evaluate how visual art can be used for historical analysis.

 

Recently Published Books:

 

Race, Riots, and Roller Coasters: The Struggle over Segregated Recreation in America (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012) by Victoria Wolcott

The Physiocrats and the World of the Enlightenment
(Cambridge University Press, 2012) by Liana Vardi

The Huron-Wendat Feast of the Dead: Indian-European Encounters in Early North America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011) by Erik Seeman

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: Friday, December 19, 2014

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